Asian-Style Bok Choy and Shiitake

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This market recipe appears courtesy of The Saratogian and Diane Whitten at Cornell Cooperative Extension.

Bok Choy, cultivated in China for centuries, is frequently available at the Saratoga Farmers’ Market. Also know as pak choi, this member of the cabbage family is related to broccoli, Brussels sprouts, mustard greens, kale and other cruciferous vegetables. These are among the healthiest vegetables thought to reduce the risk of cancer.

As a deep leafy green, bok choy may also reduce the risk of macular degeneration, the number one cause of blindness in the elderly. Both the leaves and white stems of the plant can be eaten. Since the stem takes longer to cook it’s best to cook them separately as suggested in the recipe below.

While you’re at the Saratoga Farmers’ Market pick up some garlic scapes and shiitake mushrooms (Saturday only). The oyster sauce adds an Asian flavor, but it is high in sodium, so don’t overdo it. Sesame oil is very fragrant and an integral part of this vegetable side dish.

Asian-Style Bok Choy and Shiitake

Ingredients

1 head bok choy*

1 tablespoon canola oil

1 garlic scape*, minced (2 tablespoons)

3 cups sliced shiitake mushroom* caps (5 ounces)

1 ½ tablespoons oyster sauce

1 tablespoon sesame oil

1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

 

Instructions

Trim and clean bok choy, cut leaves from stem, slice each into thin strips. Place oil in wok or skillet on medium high heat, add garlic scapes. Heat until scapes are fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add bok choy stems and stir until soft, 2 minutes.

Add mushrooms and bok choy leaves and cook stirring frequently until mushrooms are soft, about 5 minutes. Add oyster sauce and sesame oil. Serve with sesame seeds sprinkled on top.

Makes 4 servings, ½ cup each.

Nutrition per serving: 92 calories, 4 g fat, 0 sat fat, 315 mg sodium, 7 g carbs, 7 g protein.

Ingredients marked with an asterisk (*) are available at the Saratoga Farmers’ Market. 

For information about food and nutrition contact Diane Whitten at Cornell Cooperative Extension at 885-8995 or email dwhitten@cornell.edu